More Thoughts from the Front Porch

I’ve always been a life-long learner, off on some tangent, seeking knowledge. Whether it be Geometry, Philosophy, Ancient Cultures or Psychology, I seek out bits and pieces in fits and starts; I’ve been on this quest for almost twenty-five years now.

It began in my early twenties, and continues to this day. This quest is not just for the sheer pleasure it gives me though, although that is certainly part of why I love sometimes to spend a happy few hours reading, taking notes, watch documentaries, sometimes even video’s of lectures have peaked my interest. I’m a knowledge geek. I don’t just acquire in a vacuum though, because I believe that within all those subjects lies what science would call “the god particle”. Which in other words, is the string that holds together all life.

I have read lots on the Dead Sea Scrolls, I’ve delved and am always on the look out for ANYTHING concerning them. Therefore I subscribe to various archaeology and anthropological online mags, and all things concerning ancient scholarship, and new finds or publications…I’m ON IT. I’ll read the abstracts and get a feel for what sort of piece it is, is it offering anything new. Is it worth having a read?

I’m interested in transitions, those historical pivotal times when something changes and a new society, faith or culture is born. That fascinates me.

Jungian Analysis techniques, Archtypes, and all that jazz, I’ve a keen passion. Some of my favourite authors have written some of my top books on the subject – Pilgrim, by Timothy Findley, and The Manticore, by Robertson Davies.

On the subject of psychoanalytical authors, Robertson Davies is my favourite author, in any genre, doing anything, I’m like a lover of Davies work in a big big way. I love his demeanor, his words, his sense of himself, his vast girth and his wise, laughing eyes.

I’ve read Jean Shinoda-Bolen’s work, James Hillman is a favourite, also Jung himself, of course. I see within those archtypes the whispers of Babylon, and man’s past in the Bronze Age. I think a key to understanding our now, is to strive to understand our past. As that pendulum swings, things are in chaos, and large movements of people move from their homelands and floods happen, things change, and often something new is born. Whatever force of evil wind may blow, there is always the invisible glue that holds it all together. Like a spider’s web, it is a force unique, and beyond the manufacturer at the hands of man.

Within all the chaos, always, there is what some now would call “the helpers”. Those brave few who run towards fear and terror because they know their fellow human has been in the middle of that. It never occurs to them why, they just did. They do. A run to the centre of chaos is like you are running towards the divine, towards the very centre of life, breath, and where our souls come from.

Davies may have agreed, they could be his Fifth Business. For the helpers all carry that spark I think of the divine.

from wiki-answers: The Fifth Business is used in a term by Leisl. She defines fifth business by using it in a play. In an opera, there is always a prima donna, always the heroine or soprano and a fool. There is the tenor who plays the lover to her. Then the contralto who rivals the soprano and the basso who is the villan or rival to the tenor.

She also claims that you cannot make the plot work unless there is a baritone, or the fifth business. The fifth business is the odd one out because he has no rival, but he is the one who carries the twist in the plot. Although the soprano, tenor, contralto, and the basso get the fabulous music, the baritone is essential to the story plot, because he knows a secret that the others do not.

I watch TV as little as possible, so I have not watched any news coverage in close to a week. I read everything I need to online, and that’s enough. I choose to not ignore tragedy, but to turn away now and again so as not to become to anesthetized to the barrage of it all.

I have lately turned to “the helpers”, the ones out there trying to make it a better world, ignore the ones who seem fit on its destruction. Call it what you will. For my self, I choose to protect that piece inside me that values all life. I will not give back into the world that which I deplore, I will give it no breath more.

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One thought on “More Thoughts from the Front Porch

  1. Pingback: Hillman: The blackness of inked letters supports its indelible fixity | Compassionate Rebel

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